Authentic Indigenous Voices Matter

The most important thing you can do as an educator is to make sure that you are sharing authentic Indigenous voices within your classroom. This means the books you share with your class are written by Indigenous Authors.

Always check to see if books are written by Indigenous Authors.

Indigenous authors will always tell you what nation they belong to and where they are from.

It is our cultural way of being.

If it is not an Indigenous author talking about Indigenous topics, it is taking away the voices of Indigenous people.

 

So please if nothing else, always use Indigenous voices within your classrooms. 

himstanding

When Lucas Smoke learns the Ojibway art of carving from his grandfather, he proves to be a natural. He can literally make people come to life in wood. Then Lucas's growing reputation attracts a mysterious stranger, who offers him a large advance to carve a spirit mask.

goodnightworld

This book is a collaborative project of 26 noted artists of First Nations ancestry from a wide variety of BC coastal First Nations

hummingbird

This inspiring children’s book is based on a South American Indigenous story about a courageous hummingbird who defies fear and expectations in her attempt to save the forest from fire.

dipnetting

This engaging autobiographical story portrays the continuity of First Nations (Secwepemc) cultural traditions in a contemporary setting

Born Precious and Sacred

I was Born Precious and Sacred recounts with simple language and poignant photographs the ancestral teachings about the sanctity of each and every child born into First Nations communities. The repeating reading pattern makes this good for read-aloud and for beginning readers.

I Am Raven

This beautifully illustrated book tells the story of the author’s search for his totem.

Beaver Steals Fire

Author Bouchard has imagined a story of the moon’s first creation, rendered in the style of a traditional creation story.

Beneath Raven Moon

Author Bouchard has imagined a story of the moon’s first creation, rendered in the style of a traditional creation story.

moccasins

This endearing story is of a young Indigenous foster child who is given a special gift by his foster mother. Her gift of warmth and thoughtfulness helps her young foster child by encouraging self-esteem, acceptance, and love. This story, based on the author’s personal experience, was written for children of any background with a positive message of unconditional love.

Go Show the World

Celebrating the stories of Indigenous people throughout time, Wab Kinew has created a powerful rap song, the lyrics of which are the basis for the text in this beautiful picture book, illustrated by the acclaimed Joe Morse

Sometimes I feel Like a Fox

In this introduction to the Anishinaabe tradition of totem animals, young children explain why they identify with different creatures such as a deer, beaver or moose. Delightful illustrations show the children wearing masks representing their chosen animal, while the few lines of text on each page work as a series of simple poems throughout the book.

Speaking Our Truth

Canada's relationship with its Indigenous people has suffered as a result of both the residential school system and the lack of understanding of the historical and current impact of those schools. Healing and repairing that relationship requires education, awareness and increased understanding of the legacy and the impacts still being felt by Survivors and their families.

My Heart Fills with Happiness

The sun on your face. The smell of warm bannock baking in the oven. Holding the hand of someone you love. What fills your heart with happiness? This beautiful board book, with illustrations from celebrated artist Julie Flett, serves as a reminder for little ones and adults alike to reflect on and cherish the moments in life that bring us joy.

You Hold me Up

This vibrant picture book, beautifully illustrated by celebrated artist Danielle Daniel, encourages children to show love and support for each other and to consider each other’s well-being in their everyday actions.

The Great Ball Game

With characteristic action and wit, renowned Native American storyteller Bruchac retells the amusing and rousing folktale of an epic ball game between the Birds and the Animals, which offers the explanation as to why birds fly south every winter. Roth's brilliant collage art enhances the story. Full color.

Not my Girl

Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, and complemented by evocative illustrations, Not My Girl makes the original, award-winning memoir, A Stranger at Home, accessible to younger children.

When I was Eight

Nothing will stop a strong-minded young Inuit girl from learning how to read. Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things. But she does not know how to read. She must travel to the outsiders' school to learn, ignoring her father's warning of what will happen there.

Rough-Face Girl

From Algonquin Indian folklore comes one of the most haunting, powerful versions of the Cinderella tale ever told.

Coyote Columbus

A retelling of the Christopher Columbus story from a Native point of view turns this tale on its ear!

Hiawatha & the Peacemaker

Hiawatha was a strong and articulate Mohawk who was chosen to translate the Peacemaker’s message of unity for the five warring Iroquois nations during the 14th century.

I am not a number

When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick.

Shi-Shi-etko

In just four days young Shi-shi-etko will have to leave her family and all that she knows to attend residential school.

Shin-chis Canoe

This moving sequel to the award-winning Shi-shi-etko tells the story of two children's experience at residential school. Shi-shi-etko is about to return for her second year, but this time her six-year-old brother, Shin-chi, is going, too.

Fatty Legs

The moving memoir of an Inuit girl who emerges from a residential school with her spirit intact.

Stranger at Home

Traveling to be reunited with her family in the arctic, 10-year-old Margaret Pokiak can hardly contain her excitement. It’s been two years since her parents delivered her to the school run by the dark-cloaked nuns and brothers.

Morning Girl

A peaceful, tropical world is the setting for Morning Girl, a simple yet rich glimpse into the lives of a young sister and brother. Morning Girl and Star Boy grapple with timeless, universal issues such as experiencing simultaneous anger and love toward family members and the quest to discover the true self. As all siblings do, these children respond to, play off of, and learn from each other. Then a boat pulls into shore.

Orca Chief

Thousands of years ago in the village of Kitkatla, four hunters leave home in the spring to harvest seaweed and sockeye. When they arrive at their fishing grounds, exhaustion makes them lazy and they throw their anchor overboard without care for the damage it might do to marine life or the sea floor.

The Elders are Watching

A plea to respect the natural treasures of our environment and a message of concern from aboriginal leaders of the past to the people of the new millennium,

Cloudwalker

Astace, a young Gitxsan hunter, is intent on catching a group of swans with his bare hands. He is carried away by the birds' powerful wings and dropped in the clouds.

Raven Brings the Light

In a time when darkness covered the land, a boy named Weget is born who is destined to bring the light. With the gift of a raven's skin that allows him to fly as well as transform.

Peace Dancer

The children of the Tsimshian village of Kitkatla love to play at being hunters, eager for their turn to join the grown-ups. But when they capture and mistreat a crow, the Chief of the Heavens, angered at their disrespect, brings down a powerful storm.

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